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Defence Export Controls

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Australia's export control policies reflect the Government's commitment to ensure the export of defence and dual-use goods is consistent with Australia's national interests and international obligations and commitments.

The Government's policy is to encourage the export of defence and dual-use goods where it is consistent with Australia's broad national interests. Australia's export control policies and procedures are reviewed regularly to take account of changes in strategic circumstances and priorities. It is important to recognise that the purpose of export controls is not to impede innovation, research or international collaboration. Export Controls don't necessarily prohibit export activity but permits are required for export, supply, publication or brokering of controlled technology unless there is an exemption.

Southern Cross University is committed to encouraging the dissemination of information resulting from research and to open scholarly exchange of academic ideas. If you think your activity requires an export permit, contact Carolyn Piercy, Head, Office of Research or email export.controls@scu.edu.au.

What are Defence Export Controls

Defence export control laws regulate the export from Australia, of certain goods and technologies designed or adapted for military use and equipment and technologies developed for commercial needs but which may be used for military purposes ('dual-use') listed in Parts 1 and 2 respectively of the Defence and Strategic Goods List (DSGL), including the transmission of certain controlled information.

Export regulations covering the physical exportation of controlled technology have existed in Australia for many years. However, these controls have now been strengthened to restrict not only the export of physical (tangible) goods and technology, but also the supply, publication or brokering of controlled technology by electronic or other non-physical (intangible) means.

Offence provisions in relation to intangible exports came into effect on 2 April 2016.

Training and DEC Resources

Defence Export Controls resources:


In developing the export control strategy for Southern Cross University, the Office of Research would like to acknowledge the generous support, advise and materials shared from, in the first instance, the University of Queensland and the University of South Australia. Secondly the research sector for the collegiate approach to sharing advice and institutional strategies on the new export control legislation.